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LATEST NEWS & EVENTS

  • SEP
    28 2015
    COMMUNITY EVENT: Tribal North, Northern Matt & Bridge and Northern Frontier Presentations Rec Centre 10:30 am Lunch to be served
  • DEC
    12 2011
    December 12 : The website now includes confirmed PCD dates and PCD distribution locations. Keep checking for the latest updates. Every location will also show a maP.
  • MAY
    17 2011
    SCFN TRADITIONAL LANDUSE STUDY will be released presenting the results of the TLU interviews completed in the Spring of 2011. Featured report to be added soon. SCFN Members access only.
  • MAR
    03 2011
    SCFN OFFICIAL YOUTUBE CHANNEL now live. Covers topics such as First Nation Governance, Culture, Traditions and Language. Follow the progress made by the the Assembly of First Nation in Ottawa.
  • FEB
    03 2011
    REDESIGN OF SCFN.CA now live featuring new content, archive images, historical facts and much more. Soon launching SCFN YouTube and Twitter Channels in addition to Facebook.

ABOUT THE TREATY

On June 21, 1899 at Grouard Alberta, six Indigenous Leaders signed Treaty VIII between the Indians of North America and the Queen of England. Our forefathers believed this would be a true partnership and agreed to its terms for peace and friendship.

This established a Treaty process that would cover the land between Athabasca Landing and Slave Lake, from Lake Athabasca to the Rockies. Treaty VIII became the largest of its kind in Canada. Treaty VIII was the most comprehensive Treaty signed, encompassing a land mass of approximately 840.000 sq. km including Northern Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and a portion of the North West Territories.

LESSER SLAVE LAKE - FIRST NATIONS SIGNATORIES

  • CHIEF KEENOOSHAYOO
  • 2HEADMAN MOOSTOOS (SUCKER CREEK)
  • 3HEADMAN FELIX GIROUX (SWAN RIVER)
  • 4HEADMAN WEECHEEWAYSIS (DRIFTPILE)
  • 5HEADMAN CHARLES NEESUETASIS (SAWRIDGE)
  • 6HEADMAN CAPTAIN (STURGEON LAKE)


TREATY VIII COMMISSIONERS - ON BEHALF OF HM QUEEN VICTORIA
  • DAVID LAIRD
  • BJ.A.J. MCKENNA
  • CJ.H. ROSS


In Alberta, there are 24 First Nations living within Treaty VIII boundaries and this includes one half of Northern Alberta. Over one hundred years ago, our forefathers sat with the Treaty Commissioners and deliberated upon the needs of our people. To our leaders, the Treaty was an agreement on how the lands were to be shared with our people and the immigrant settlers. To our forefathers, it was an agreement on the rights, benefits and opportunities our people could expect to receive from the immigrant society. The Treaty made provisions for every conceivable facet of our people’s lives, and as such, was a negotiated blueprint for social and economic development and means for our people to adjust to changing conditions.

Our Indian leaders were recognized as having sufficient authority and capacity to negotiate on behalf of future generations and to enter into a Treaty. Their powers and capabilities were not challenged by the Treaty commissioners, but were actually respected through the symbolic gestures of medals, suits and flags. They signed Treaty confident in knowing their values, traditions and institutions remained untouched. The tone of the negotiations makes it evident Treaty promised our people the continued right to a selfrespecting and dignified existence in the manner which we were accustomed.

The initial intent was not to subject our people to the volume of legislation and the ever increasing controls which have ultimately consumed our lives and internal affairs. The commissioners surely did not contemplate such a result when they promised our lives would not be disrupted, and said:

“…as all the rights you have now have will not be interfered with, anything you get in addition must be clear gain….”

Acceptance of Treaty did not compromise or alter our right to govern ourselves nor did it give permission to any government to delegate our decision-making powers to a foreign and distant bureaucracy. It is important to measure the Government's position in fulfilling its obligations against what the negotiating parties intended in 1899. This is significant not only for its relevance in determining how we perceive Treaty today, but also forms a meaningful part of the history of the Government’s dealings with us. Treaty VIII created mutual obligations as required for the parties to live peacefully with one another, and in so doing, recognized the continuing jurisdictions of First Nations within Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan to govern themselves and their territories.

Treaty VIII did not extinguish any First Nations’ Inherent Right to govern themselves. The primary purpose of Treaty VIII was to provide economic assurances to Treaty VIII First Nations through the protection of their livelihood rights. The Treaty promises of education, health and housing were extensions of these livelihood rights. It is important to remember that Treaty VIII was an agreement between two sovereign nations. No viable relationship between the Government of Canada and our people is going to be accomplished to our satisfaction unless the fundamental issue of our Treaty and its interpretation is adhered to, respected and implemented. With a better Government-Indian relationship now being contemplated, there is the opportunity to repair and restore the wreckage of the past one hundred years.

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OSTESIMÂW IYINÎSIWIN PASKWÂWIYINÎNÂHK

"Ka-kí-kiskéyihtétan óma, namoya kinwés maka aciyowés pohko óma óta ka-hayayak wasétam askihk, ékwa ka-kakwéy miskétan kiskéyihtamowin, iyinísiwin, kistéyitowin, mina nánisitotatowin kakiya ayisiniwak, ékosi óma kakiya ka-wahkotowak." "Realize that we as human are on Earth for only a short time and must use this time to gain wisdom, knowledge, respect and understanding for all human beings since we are all relatives."
Cree Elders' Heritage - Words of Wisdom